If you’re attempting to find agent to represent your work, you’re probably familiar with queries. (If not, go read Query Shark— it’s an invaluable resource!) The more you read of queries, the better prepared you’ll be to write your own. If you’re still looking for more practice, you can read the back cover copy (or jacket flap copy) on library books or books you see in stores.

The goal with writing a query is to give your reader an idea of what story you’re trying to tell and entice them to read more. You don’t have to (and shouldn’t) give away the ending, but the big choice that your protagonist must make or the major conflict that they’ll face should be clear. Generally, queries run about 250-350 words, though sometimes shorter, punchier queries land well, too.

As a former intern to a literary agent and editor, I’ve read a lot of queries. With this critique, I’ll read through your query, highlight what is and isn’t working, and give suggestions (with explanations) of what may make it stronger.

Price: $30 for the first round, $15 each round after

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